What Happened to Storytelling and Anticipation in Advertising?

Fifty years ago, Chevy ads were the best. I know that because I still remember them, and I am not one to remember what I ate for lunch, let alone 50-year-old ads. Although we were a Ford family in the ’50s, we became a Chevy family because of Dinah Shore and these great ads.


* * * * *
I’m not an advertising expert by any means but I know a little about marketing, and marketing is at its best when it features storytelling and anticipation that equals surprise. Television used to be a place where those traits were applied in advertising, especially when it came to cars.
Fifty years ago, Chevy ads were the best. I know that because I still remember them, and I am not one to remember what I ate for lunch, let alone 50-year-old ads. Although we were a Ford family in the ’50s, we became a Chevy family because of Dinah Shore and these great ads.
The first is story-telling Broadway style. The seond recalls the days when Americans anticipated the new cars and Detroit kept the styling locked up like nuclear secrets. Note that Dinah and Pat Boone comment in song on the subtleties in the ad and how careful Detroit is about sharing only the briefest of glimpses.

Read more: http://www.marketingprofs.com/opinions/2007/21197/what-happened-to-storytelling-and-anticipation-in-advertising#ixzz32u7wzHgg

Happiness Matters

Happiness is the driving force behind everything Americans do. It is the key to determining their wants, needs and desires. It is the essence of the American Dream and is as important as the air you breathe.


Even our Declaration of Independence calls for the pursuit of happiness. And yet a 2006 study by the Pew Research Center found that only 34 percent of Americans consider themselves “very happy,” 50 percent “pretty happy,” and fifteen percent report that they are “not too happy.”
One of the most popular courses at Harvard University teaches happiness and creating “a fulfilling and flourishing life.” In fact, the course on “Positive Psychology” outdraws “Introductory Economics.” That scares me. Have we have gone so far down the road of work, power, and greed that we need to be taught about happiness?

Read more: http://www.marketingprofs.com/opinions/2007/21776/happiness-matters#ixzz32u73QcHE